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Comparison between pitch discrimination in normal children, children with hearing aids, and children with cochlear implant

  • The Erratum to this article has been published in The Egyptian Journal of Otolaryngology 2019 35:Art23

Abstract

Background

Cochlear hearing loss causes variations in the way that sounds are represented in the auditory system and for cochlear implant (Cl) users, pitch information that is transmitted to the central nervous system is not ideal. The aim of this study was to compare between pitch discrimination and its associated language development in normal children, children with cochlear implant and children with hearing aids to know which prostheses is more useful to the patient.

Materials and methods

The study measured pitch discrimination test, just noticeable difference test and language evaluation in 45 children divided into 3 groups.

Results

This study suggested that CI had less pitch discrimination ability but better language development than HA.

Conclusions

The benefit that CI users get through better accessibility to high frequencies outweighs the deficit in pitch discrimination.

Change history

  • 14 February 2019

    In the article titled “Comparison between pitch discrimination in normal children, children with hearing aids, and children with cochlear implant”, published on pages 332–336, Issue 4, Volume 34 of Journal - The Egyptian Journal of Otolaryngology, the list of authors and affiliations is incorrectly written as “Rania E. Ahmed - Audio Vestibular Unit, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Alexandria University, Alexandria, Egypt”. The correct list of authors and their affiliations should read as;

    “Samir Ibrahim Asal - Assistant Professor of Audiology, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Faculty of Medicine, Alexandria University, Alexandria, Egypt.

    Ossama Ahmed Sobhy - Professor of Audiology, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Faculty of Medicine, Alexandria University, Alexandria, Egypt.

    Nesrine Hazem Hamouda - Lecturer in Phoniatrics, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Faculty of Medicine, Alexandria University, Alexandria, Egypt.

    Rania Ebraheem Ahmed - Audio Vestibular Unit, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Alexandria University, Alexandria, Egypt”.

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Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Rania E. Ahmed MSC.

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Ahmed, R.E. Comparison between pitch discrimination in normal children, children with hearing aids, and children with cochlear implant. Egypt J Otolaryngol 34, 332–336 (2018). https://doi.org/10.4103/ejo.ejo_91_17

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Keywords

  • pitch
  • hearing aids
  • cochlear implant
  • language