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Assessment of language disorders in low birth weight children

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Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the study was to determine the size and distribution of language disorders among low birth weight (LBW) children to devise a plan for early detection, proper assessment, intervention, and prevention of these problems if possible.

Patients and methods

Eighty children were included in this study. The study group consisted of 50 children with a history of LBW, 31 boys and 19 girls, with a mean age of 4.3 ± 1.6 years. The control group consisted of 30 children with a history of normal birth weight, 13 boys and 17 girls, with a mean age of 5.1 ± 1.3 years. Children in the two groups were statistically matched in their age and sex distribution. All participant children were subjected to an interview, general examination, vocal tract examination, neurological examination, ENT examination, evaluation of various aptitudes by formal testing, psychiatric evaluation, audiological examination, and language evaluation using the Arabic Preschool Language Scale-4.

Results

The results from this study revealed that LBW in addition to poor neonatal outcome and prematurity was an important risk factor for poor language abilities in children.

Conclusion

Early consultation is recommended for LBW children with high risk factors in order to facilitate early detection and proper management of language disorders.

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Correspondence to Haytham Mamdouh MD.

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Mamdouh, H., El-Badry, M.M., Zaky, E.A. et al. Assessment of language disorders in low birth weight children. Egypt J Otolaryngol 31, 254–263 (2015). https://doi.org/10.4103/1012-5574.168362

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Keywords

  • delayed language development (DLD)
  • language assessment
  • low birth weight